VipinKumar R. pawar

I AM

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Hello,

I'm VipinKumar Rajendra Pawar

Proficient at executing good safety and health improvement practices for optimum utilization of resources and providing them with a safe working environment. Excellent interpersonal and negotiation skills with strong problem solving and organizational abilities.


Education
PhD Scholar

University of Mumbai

Masters in Engineering:VLSI and Embedded Systems

University of Pune

Bachelor of Engineering: Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering

Mumbai University


Experience
Augmentedd Reality

IIRSG, Netherlands (2018-till date)

GIS Application Developer

IIRSG, Netherlands (2014-2018)

Embedded System Developer

AMS India (2011-2014)


My Skills
Matlab Coding
C / VB Coding
Image Processing
Data Mining

2

Research Awards Won

8

Research Paper Published

2964

Projects Done

2

Books Published

Professional Member

ISRO-IIRS

Co-Ordinator, ISRO-IIRS Outreach Program, ISRO, Dehradun, India

MIEEE

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Professional association, California

MIAENG

International Association of Engineers, Hongkong

MATSC

Advanced Television Systems Committee, Inc.,California, USA

MIFERP

Institute For Engineering Research and Publication (IFERP), India

AP-MICROCHIP

Microchip Technology Inc., USA

SOME OF WORK

2021-05-13T11:59:26Z: M2.0 15 km NW from Havre-Saint-Pierre, QC, 2021-05-13T18:28:53Z: M1.7 15 km N from..

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Natural Resources Canada - Earthquakes Canada
2021-05-13T11:59:26Z: M2.0 15 km NW from Havre-Saint-Pierre, QC
− Earthquakes Canada • 11 hours ago
2021-05-13T18:28:53Z: M1.7 15 km N from Beaupre, QC • 11 hours ago
7 more new posts. Read more at Feedspot →
Quake Watch
Last Updated on May 14, 2021 by PuterMan An earthquake Magnitude 6.7 has occurred in Off W Coast Of Northern Sumatra [Andaman Islands to Sumatra]. QVSData ref EMSC984397 All links in this post are direct to the destination unless otherwise stated and...
− PuterMan • 21 hours ago
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Strong Earthquake Near East Coast Of Honshu. Japan 13-May-21 • 21 hours ago
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Day in Review

 

DAY IN REVIEW
The Orpheus submersible robot is being developed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and JPL to explore the deep ocean autonomously.
Robotic Navigation Tech Will Explore the Deep Ocean

Terrain-relative navigation helped Perseverance land – and Ingenuity fly – autonomously on Mars. Now it’s time to test a similar system while exploring another frontier.

On May 14, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Okeanos Explorer will depart from Port Canaveral in Florida on a two-week expedition led by NOAA Ocean Exploration, featuring the technology demonstration of an autonomous underwater vehicle. Called Orpheus, this new class of submersible robot will showcase a system that will help it find its way and identify interesting scientific features on the seafloor.

Terrain-relative navigation was instrumental in helping NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance Mars rover make its precision touch down on the Red Planet on Feb. 18. The system allowed the descending robot to visually map the Martian landscape, identify hazards, and then choose a safe place to land without human assistance. In a similar way, the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter uses a vision-based navigation system to track surface features on the ground during flight in order to estimate its movements across the Martian surface.

Developed by engineers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, an evolution of the vision-based navigation that has been used on Mars will now undergo a trial run a little closer to home: off the U.S. East Coast in the Atlantic Ocean.

Large, high-power location-finding equipment like sonar would normally be required to navigate the dark and often murky waters near the seabed. By utilizing a low-power system of cameras and lights, along with advanced software, Orpheus is an order of magnitude lighter than most deep-sea submersibles. Smaller than a quad bike and weighing about 550 pounds (250 kilograms), Orpheus is designed to be nimble, easy to operate, and rugged while exploring depths inaccessible to most vehicles.

Designed by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in collaboration with JPL, Orpheus can work untethered almost anywhere in the ocean, including the most extreme depths. Ultimately, the project team hopes to see a swarm of these underwater robots work as a team to build 3D maps of the vast regions of unexplored ocean floor in the hadal zone – regions deeper than 20,000 feet (6,000 meters). But before the robot can explore these depths, it must first be put through its paces in shallower waters.

Diving Into the Future

“This tech demo will be used to gather data to demonstrate the viability of terrain-relative navigation in the ocean while also showing how multiple robots will operate together in extreme environments,” said Russell Smith, robotics mechanical engineer at JPL. “These tests will put us on track to start future dives into the hadal zone and intelligently seek out exciting regions of high biological activity.”

Orpheus’ version of vision-based navigation is called visual-inertial odometry, or xVIO, and it works by using a system of advanced cameras and pattern-matching software along with instruments that can precisely measure its orientation and motion. As Orpheus travels over the seafloor, xVIO identifies features – such as rocks, shells, and coral – below the vehicle. Like remembering landmarks during a road trip, xVIO will construct 3D maps using these features as waypoints to help it navigate. But this system is more than simply a means to prevent the submersible robot from getting lost.

The high-resolution maps xVIO creates are stored to memory so that when Orpheus returns to the area, it will recognize the unique distribution of the features and use them as a starting point to expand its exploration. And when working with robot buddies, maps can be shared, cross-referenced, and developed to quickly identify areas of scientific interest.

“In the future, some of the most extreme ocean environments will be within our reach. From deep ocean trenches to hydrothermal vents, there are many new destinations we will explore,” said Andy Klesh, a systems engineer also at JPL. “By staying small, we’ve created a new, simplified tool for ocean scientists – one that directly benefits NASA as an analogue system for autonomous space exploration.”

But Klesh noted another virtue of the collaboration between NASA and organizations like WHOI and NOAA, with their extensive oceanographic expertise: The technologies being developed to explore Earth’s oceans with smart, small, and rugged autonomous underwater vehicles could ultimately be harnessed to explore the oceans on other worlds.

Earth analogues are often used as environmental stand-ins for other locations in the solar system. For example, Jupiter’s moon Europa possesses a subsurface ocean that could host conditions favorable to life.

“At hadal depths on Earth, the pressures are roughly equivalent to the bottom of Europa’s subsurface ocean, thought to be maybe 80 kilometers [50 miles] deep,” said Tim Shank, the biologist leading WHOI’s HADEX (Hadal Exploration) program. “It is a profound thing to think that this expedition could be the stepping stone to new discoveries about our own planet, including answering that most fundamental question: Is life unique to Earth, or are there other places beyond this pale blue dot where life could have arisen? But before we can explore Europa or any other ocean world, we have to better understand our own home first.”

For more information about the technology demonstration, see:

https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex2102/welcome.html

 

2021-05-12T05:40:22Z: M2.3 130 km S from Clyde River, NU, 2021-05-13T01:50:39Z: M2.8 88 km SE from Pond..

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Natural Resources Canada - Earthquakes Canada
2021-05-12T05:40:22Z: M2.3 130 km S from Clyde River, NU
− Earthquakes Canada • 21 hours ago
2021-05-13T01:50:39Z: M2.8 88 km SE from Pond Inlet, NU • 21 hours ago
3 more new posts. Read more at Feedspot →
Quake Watch
Last Updated on May 13, 2021 by PuterMan An earthquake Magnitude 6 has occurred in South Of Panama [Central America]. QVSData ref EMSC984056 All links in this post are direct to the destination unless otherwise stated and you will leave this site. Be...
− PuterMan • 21 hours ago
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2021-05-07T21:04:46Z: M2.3 182 km SE of Yakutat, AK, 2021-05-12T01:45:39Z: M1.5 56 km S from Port-Cartier,..

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Natural Resources Canada - Earthquakes Canada
2021-05-07T21:04:46Z: M2.3 182 km SE of Yakutat, AK
− Earthquakes Canada • 9 hours ago
2021-05-12T01:45:39Z: M1.5 56 km S from Port-Cartier, QC • 9 hours ago
18 more new posts. Read more at Feedspot →
Quake Watch
Last Updated on May 13, 2021 by PuterMan An earthquake Magnitude 6.7 has occurred in Mauritius – Reunion Region [Indian Ocean]. QVSData ref EMSC983678 All links in this post are direct to the destination unless otherwise stated and you will leave t...
− PuterMan • 8 hours ago
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Strong Earthquake Mauritius – Reunion Region 12-May-21 • 13 hours ago
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Day in Review

 

DAY IN REVIEW
Screenshot of the video that was stitched together were then reprojected to optimize viewing in an anaglyph.
Seeing NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Fly in 3D

A new video gives viewers the sensation of standing on the Red Planet and seeing the action firsthand.

When NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter took to the Martian skies on its third flight on April 25, the agency’s Perseverance rover was there to capture the historic moment. Now NASA engineers have rendered the flight in 3D, lending dramatic depth to the flight as the helicopter ascends, hovers, then zooms laterally off-screen before returning for a pinpoint landing. Seeing the sequence is a bit like standing on the Martian surface next to Perseverance and watching the flight firsthand.

Located on the rover’s mast, or “head,” the zoomable dual-camera Mastcam-Z imager provided the view. Along with producing images that enable the public to follow the rover’s daily discoveries, the cameras provide key data to help engineers navigate and scientists choose interesting rocks to study.

Justin Maki, an imaging scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, led the team that stitched the images into a video. The frames of the video were reprojected to optimize viewing in an anaglyph, or an image seen in 3D when viewed with color-filtered glasses (you can create your own 3D glasses in a few minutes).

Maki’s been creating 3D imaging of Mars since his days as a graduate student processing images from NASA’s Sojourner, the first Mars rover in 1997. But this is the first time he’s created actual 3D video of an aircraft flying on Mars. “The Mastcam-Z video capability was inherited from the Mars Science Laboratory MARDI (MArs Descent Imager) camera,” Maki said. “To be reusing this capability on a new mission by acquiring 3D video of a helicopter flying above the surface of Mars is just spectacular.” The videos of the helicopter are the most extensive 3D video yet from the Mastcam-Z team.

The rover’s drivers and robotic-arm operators use a more sophisticated 3D system to understand exactly how things are positioned on Mars before planning the rover’s movements. But, according to Maki, team members have also been viewing still 3D images for rover-drive planning. “A helicopter flying on Mars opens a new era for Mars exploration. It’s a great demonstration of a new technology for exploration,” he added. “With each flight we open up more possibilities.”

The April 25 flight brought with it several other firsts, with Ingenuity rising 16 feet (5 meters), then flying downrange 164 feet (50 meters). That was a record until Ingenuity traveled 873 feet (266 meters) on its fourth flight, on April 30. For its fifth flight, on May 7, Ingenuity completed its first one-way trip, traveling 423 feet (129 meters), then reaching an altitude of 33 feet (10 meters) above its new landing field.

The flights began as a technology demonstration intended to prove that powered, controlled flight on Mars is possible. Now they will serve as an operations demonstration, exploring how aerial scouting and other functions could benefit future exploration of Mars.

More About Perseverance

Arizona State University in Tempe leads the operations of the Mastcam-Z instrument, working in collaboration with Malin Space Science Systems in San Diego.

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

nasa.gov/perseverance

More About Ingenuity

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was built by JPL, which also manages the technology demonstration project for NASA Headquarters. It is supported by NASA’s Science, Aeronautics Research, and Space Technology mission directorates. NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, and NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, provided significant flight performance analysis and technical assistance during Ingenuity’s development. AeroVironment Inc., Qualcomm, and SolAero also provided design assistance and major vehicle components. Lockheed Martin Space designed and manufactured the Mars Helicopter Delivery System.

 

More to Explore on Mars

A student challenge for summer – plus, build a Mars helicopter with us! 

More to Explore on Mars This Summer

Summertime is just around the corner, and with it comes new opportunities to get students engaged in NASA's exploration of Mars. Whether you are looking to close out the school year or looking ahead at summer learning for youth or yourself, read on to find out about newly added events and opportunities to join the adventure with NASA!

Upcoming Events

Mission to Mars Student Challenge for Summer Camps

MAY 13 - JULY 15

Mission to Mars Student Challenge for Summer Camps

Are you a camp or afterschool-group leader? Learn about an exciting opportunity to immerse your youth in the latest exploration of Mars with NASA. Our popular Mission to Mars Student Challenge is back with a summertime edition!

Learn More and Register

Learning Space With NASA Live Stream – Build Your Own Mars Helicopter

WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 9 AM PDT

Learning Space with NASA Live Stream – Build Your Own Mars Helicopter

In this live stream for students in grades K-8, we'll build our own paper helicopters as we learn about the first helicopter to fly on Mars. Plus, we'll answer your questions during a live Q&A.

Register for Q&A

Watch Online

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NASA EXPRESS newsletter

Did you know that NASA has a weekly newsletter for educators and students? Sign up for the NASA EXPRESS to get the latest NASA STEM resources and opportunities for the education community delivered to your inbox every Thursday.

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Explore More

Educator Resources: NASA's Mission to Mars Student Challenge

Educator Resources

Student Activities: Learning Space With NASA at Home

Student Activities

Live Streams

Live Streams: Teaching Space With NASA

Events

Educational Events from NASA-JPL Edu

Teachable Moments

Teachable Moments: NASA's Perseverance Rover Lands on Mars

Educator Resources

Educator Resources: NASA #CountdownToMars STEM Toolkit
 
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VipinKumar R. Pawar
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India